BC Inside Passage | From Klemtu To Bella Bella |Bella Bella To Shearwater Marina

Klemtu to Bella Bella

 Wednesday 16 April 2014

Storm warning!

Again At 10.30 a.m. We fuel at gas station, fill water and leave Klemtu at 10.50 a.m. with  5-6 k Low South West swell 2-3 metre. Wind south west 15 At 12.30 We motor sailed to Susan Rock at 7.6 k At  13.30 p.m. Passing Susan Rock 3.5 k Wind on nose and rain We arrived at Bella Bella and dock. Tired after the day before’s long and cold passage, we had a late start. The weather forecasting talked about a gale but in the evening. So we decided to stick our nose out and see how far we could get. If it turned bad, again we could have a great downwind sail back into Klemtu. We motored out into the now familiar wet and cold. Nothing spectacular at first but the wind did come up from the West and so did the head sail. We needed to make time so I decided not to be a purest and sail slowly as this winter season is not to be messed with. I was a little uneasy as it started to blow and switch to the South East. The wind strengthened  as we neared our turning point Of Susan Rock, it did strengthen, South East now being dead on the nose) and it seemed to take for ever for us to inch our way against wind and tide into the more protected waters of Seaforth Channel. Non the less our old engine kept thumping away even as the wind increased and the rain became torrential. So with speeds of between 1.7knots and 3.5 we made our way over the last 20 nautical miles against the wind and tide to Bella Bella. Not too many photos as we are a little nervous about destroying our cameras before getting to the hot places. Not that I believe any exist, I am also starting to doubt all this global warming stuff lol. As we neared Bella Bella one of the fast ferries that link the coastal communities roared past out of the evening gloom. It took him 1hour 20mins to cover the same distance that we had done in over 8 hours.



 

 Bella Bella To Shearwater Marina

Thursday 17 April 2014

Storm warning!

Leave Bella Bella late 10.50 a.m. Arrived at Shearwater Marina at 11.35 a.m. This time at Shearwater is free of charge for mooring during low season. They will start to charge for moorage on the 1st of May 2014. So we can stay until we are ready to go further down south. An expense for boat docked at Shearwater Marina available To do laundry about $12-15 for about 10 kg Shower fees $1 per minute Internet WiFi $11 per day (24 hours) Electric line $5 per day (only 15 amp power cord) Note: The place for laundry and shower is connected in one big room, clean. The funny thing is a shiny lunie coin doesn’t work for washer machine that accepted only old dull coin. There is one restaurant which if in fishing season they make really nice Halibut fish and chips, We still order and it just ok with two pints of beer cost about $40.

Environment care: At  Shearwater provide a good source of trash separation for recycle : Glass bottle, Cans, Plastic, Carton – Paper, Trash.

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Free moorage at Shearwater Marina during low season {April}

 

Friday 18 April 2014  Storm warning! Dock At Shearwater Marina, Check on Depth sounder doesn’t work properly.  If the hull transducer is shot then it is a haul out and money. If it is the sounder itself then it is also money. About $350 to $600 depending on which option.

Saturday 19 April 2014 Storm warning! Dock At Shearwater Marina, Windy and using wind generator to produce battery ,cloudy and rain all day

Sunday 20 April 2014 Storm warning! Monday waves can be high 7 Metres! Dock at Shearwater Marina cloudy and with sometimes windy and rain

Monday 21 April 2014 Start to sunshine mix cloud. Sailing Vessel Linger Longer left for Alaska. We also plan to leave tomorrow. The main reason we still here is that I made some mistakes. 1) Luksana ran over a log and probably destroyed the depth sounder transducer. My mistake :-) 2) Fuel dock closed when it should have been open. So it would be touch and go for us to reach Port Hardy. 3) I lost my wallet. So after a frantic search late last night and using a pay phone in the early hours to block the cards; it had been found. Just as I was cancelling them,  would you believe a staff member had found it and put it in the safe in the Bar! Another reason to recommend Shearwater.                

Happy Easter holiday!

 

BC Inside Passage |Pushing South from Bishop Bay to Klemtu

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Fraser Butedale Lake

Bishop Bay to Klemtu

Tuesday 15 April 2014

Gale Warning!

Even though the  forecast was grim we  decided to see how far we could get.  If it got too bad we could always have a sleigh back to the hot springs.

In April the weather in North Coast is still feel like winter. We left Bishop Bay at 7.30 a.m. while tide low and suddenly engine had decreased from 6 k to 3 k. Something had gone wrong and Stephen’s face turn very concerned. We head back to Bishop Bay to check what is wrong. After docked the boat up at the dock Stephen checked propeller and we found old rope and kelp had wrapped around the Blades. It was fabric so he cleared it off with a big smile.  All is well, so we leave Bishop Bay a second time in 2 hours.

Better on the dock than wrapped around the prop

Better on the dock than wrapped around the prop.

We next leave Bishop Bay at 08.15 a.m.

We intended to head to Klumtu today. Two hours later the weather had been windy with gale warning and rain. Plus more waves that doesn’t high but will make it difficult for long distance motoring to Klemtu. At 10.35 a.m. We then decided to changed direction to go back to Hartley Bay and starting using head sail with 6 k.

Then again the wind stopped. We change to go back to Klemtu channel. 3-4 k until we reach to Fraser Butedale Lake at 13.30 p.m.

Passed Nomel Lake at 14.30 p.m. with 6 k

Passing Green Inlet with 6-7 k at 16.40 p.m.

Around 20.00 p.m. we arrived at Klemtu

Another long day.

Using propane and candles tonight to keep warm inside cabin.

Fresh snow just above Bishops Bay

Fresh snow just above Bishop Bay


 

 

BC Inside Passage | From Hartley Bay to Bishop Bay

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At Bishop Bay {Hot Springs}

Hartley Bay to Bishop Bay

Monday 14 April 2014 Today our morning coffee discussion is to leave Hartley Bay for Klemtu. Shortly after leaving Luksana ran over the only log in the ocean! Actually these waters are full of debris from the logging on the coast.  They lie with the wind and so are hard to see in the chop, especially in the early morning light. We rolled the log under the bow. The procedure is to get the prop out of gear so as to minimize the chance of serious damage. The log came clear amidships, and it was not until a couple of days later we discovered the damage we had done to a very important piece of equipment. The sun is not bright with shade from the cloud. We leave Hartley Bay at 08.10 a.m DSC_0204 11.00 a.m. Pilot Point Watching carefully for more logs. We saw many. 6 Knots A large cloud system came cover the area quickly. We open radio and listened to a new  Gale Warning!  from coast guard. After 3 hours of butting into strengthening head winds we changed our destination today from Klemtu to Bishop Bay to avoid gale. We will never make it to Klumtu anyway with the run of 3 k. Start to rain 13.10 p.m. Tied up at Bishop Bay Beware Danger Mice ! On our last visit in 2011 we got mice on board. That is a real pain and they made nests and where very hard to get rid of. They also can be very destructive, especially eating through wires etc. Of course with the ton of rice flour pasta on board I am sure any mouse would think our boat as the promised land. To prevent mice from climbing onboard the boat, Stephen cut beer cans and put them across the mooring lines that connect to the dock. We met a brand new luxury boat “Mermaid Explorer” destined for Australia, docked and stay overnight.


 

Inside Passage | Departure PR Arrived Hartley Bay

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Prince Rupert to Hartley Bay

Saturday 12 April 2014

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At 06.35 am we untied from the dock we have headed out into a bright clear dawn for a while. There was little time to feel nostalgic, as we still had numerous tasks to perform and the  morning fog soon formed to envelope us in its cloak of  white ambiguity. When I started sailing Fog was a frightening experience. Compass and dead reckoning, estimating speed, strong tidal and river estuary cross currents. GPS, AIS and Radar take the bowel laxative part away, so no worries as long as the other guys are paying attention!

Prince Rupert to Hartley Bay

Frost in the morning at the dock and very cold. May and Marty knocked on our deck to make sure we are awake, up and ready.  After making coffee we start the motor of Beautiful Swimmer and leave from Prince Rupert.   At 10.30 a.m. we passed Hammer Island At 12.00 a.m. Passing Oona River 5.5 K no wind ….Foggy…..  At 13.15 p.m. 6.2 K 13.45 p.m. White House 6.5 k 15.00 p.m.

Then we had Ice cream and strawberry while we Passing Ormond Point 8 – 8.8 k  At  17.00 p.m. Passing Low inlet and we decided to go further and it is not dark yet as the boat can run at that time to maximum  9.1 K {7 k average} Then we arrive at 20.05 p.m. Hartley Bay

At 20.30 p.m. We tided up and got free shore power. Hartley Bay is a generous dock that you can plug power line to the boat without charge. There is small fuel station, Water. People are friendly. Unfortunately our friends the Hills where out of the village. It would have been hard to say goodbye as Steve has known them for 30 years.

It was a long day and we had dinner at 21.00 p.m.

Luksana said I could add captions, but I think the photos speak for themselves. The North Coast is still one of the almost pristine wonderland’s the planet. Could not but feel sad and concerned that this beauty is under real threat from the Tar Sands pipeline that is being fast tracked by the present Canadian Government is threatening this beauty for ever.

Funny they never build pipelines through the centre of cities or next door to the Houses of Governments. But these natural Cathedrals, Art Galleries and National Treasures that are all unique and can never be replaced are being put at risk so that a few can make money producing more of what is destroying the planet. I must admit I did feel selfish in leaving this special place as it faces its biggest threat since the glaciers retreated.

Sunday 13 April 2014

2nd night stay at Hartley Bay Check engine and so on. Beautiful Full moon tonight.

Sailing association ‘Sail Away’ Dock Party

 

Greetings  from Shearwater, BC Inside Passage 

We have currently docked Beautiful Swimmer at Shearwater because free moorage and waiting for the gale to stop blowing from south.  For the past days we have collected some photos of scenery from the British Columbia’s Inside Passage,  both on a nice day and then cold rainy and windy days. The last 2 weeks have seen us say good bye to many friends family and familiar places. In the end it was too hard to say good bye to everyone and so we tried to leave quietly! However friends have a way of surprising you and we had a very moving send off from the members of our extended family at the North Coast Sailing Association. Marty and Mae came down the evening before we left with BEER! They also helped us before dawn the following day to untie the lines and head out into the unknown.  Thanks to everyone who have made our lives so rich over the years! May your dreams come true as well.

~ Cheers ~


 

Inside Passage Channel

Sail Away Dock Party

Place : North Coast Sailing Association, Prince Rupert

Date : Saturday 29 March 2014

Dog party at the dock with Three GR. Definitely we will miss their warm fur and the fun we used to play together.


 


Night before departure Prince Rupert

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Up to date

Dear Readers and friends,

To Pack and untie the lines to leave this dock seemed so easy for us. Unfortunately nothing is simple. With all the paper work and then medical ops for Stephen things have gotten delayed. The weather is showing no signs of being kind so we took the advantage to do more preparation and work on the boat. This post is rather technical.  To remedy the problems what we have found and what is going on in the past two weeks. When will we leave? Everyday our friends keep asking the same question. I have remember this question since the last July 2013 onward. We will let you know.  Real soon now!  Best wishes


 

Mast |Continued from previous post

 

 

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We were noticed that wind generator does not work properly. It was very loud noise when it catch the wind. We use four wind generator which is powerful to make energy for the boat.

Steve changed the bearings and put new brushes in. Allan our friend from the dock,  has use the same Four Winds  generator and he knows how to make it work properly. Allan drove up from Smitthers after he say good bye to us many times.


 


 Winches checked | taken apart cleaned and greased.

One day Rolf came up to our boat and noticed about the winches had  not been properly installed. He then volunteered to check it. This lead to him completely stripping all the winches  and clean and greased them. He work very quickly and took them  apart, cleaned, then attached them back together. I can compare it to like watching a  cooking show.

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More photos

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“A ship is safe in harbour, but that’s not what ships are for.”

― William G.T. Shedd

 


 

 

 

 

 

Broke Canadian Ingenuity |Incredible Swiss Skill {continued}

DSC_2052 DSC_1861 This post is very important to us and to continued from our previous post ‘ Mast Head Rigging Check‘.  After we took head sail furler down after Stephen has found the damage part at the mast head fitting that causes the head sail to jam. It had happened a few times before when we were out. We must fix it as it would only get worse and could cause a big problem if we cannot fold the head sail in time.

Silvia and Ralph came up with their special tools to design a snag cover with industrial graded plastic.  They had found it washed up on a beach in Alaska It is 2 pieces square in shape. Measured in  size to cover the damage part. DSC_2014 Over the last couple of years we have got to know Ralf and Silvia and have become good friends. They are very good people and have shared much of their knowledge and experiences with us. And encouraged us not to give up on our dream when we got despondent. Steve had the idea but he admits he did not have the skill to create this piece. It took about 8 hours to manufacture and to fit the piece.  Total cost. $4 for stainless bolts and $1 for the bit of epoxy putty. All they would accept was a Pad Thai dinner we shared on the boat that night.

Here it i clamped job done.

Repair completed $5 (replacement $ 3,500).

Time for the heroin to descend

Time for the heroin to descend

Pad Thai on board

Related post: Pad Thai

It is nice that we can have Pad Thai once in a while on board.   I think It is good to keep this menu on board, make it simple but still keep the original taste of the sauce. Pad Thai sauce ingredients (Including Palm sugar, Tamarind paste and fish sauce) can kept in a dry place}  Without vegetables we can growth our own bean sprouts from mung beans seeds. These work better in a warmer climate. Then red onion, eggs, cooking oil and dry flakes chilli and paprika powder. That’s all we need. Peanut and meat is a choice we can add as we wish.

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Mast Head Rigging Check

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Second week of March 2014

We take off the head sail. This is so we can do some maintenance  on the Hood  ‘Sea furler’  This is to do some repairs so as to make sure it is in good condition as we travel across the oceans.

Silvia and Ralph, our Swiss cruiser friends (They both are ship builder)  came to help to bring it down.

The first day, Steve went up to do some checking and measuring as he has to do one of the harder jobs in attaching a special fitting to secure another forestay for our storm sail.

Steph climb up to check first, not very comfortable and the windy conditions made it difficult to work as the boat was moving. Still no rain and the temp was above 0c so we do not want to waste time.

And second day Silvia help to do this. She climb quickly as if she hiking. She is much lighter than Steph and he winched her to the top very fast.

Finally we take down the sea furl. One part has been damaged from normal wear and tear so now we must try and manufacture a piece to fit and fix.. Then the fun part someone must climb to put it back top of the mast. Luksana’s  tern :-)

After these mast job we are done! No more things to do. Then the adventure begins.

Have a good week.

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2nd Day

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Flags to our dream destinations | It is customary to fly Courtesy National flags once your vessel has been checked into a new country.

DSC_1649  We just have these colourful of South Pacific flags on the boat. We ordered from U.S. because it is hard to find in Canada.

These our main dream destination flags. We have to present this flag after we arrive and have been allowed entry to each country. The yellow quarantine flag is flown before entry is granted.

Keep in Touch.

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French Polynesia

Tahiti and Society island group are the most famous along with their lesser known Marquises, Gambiers  Tuamotus and Astral groups. Polynesians were granted French citizenship and the islands’ status was changed to an overseas territory; the islands’ name was changed in 1957 to Polynésie Française (French Polynesia).

The islands of French Polynesia have a total land area of 3,521.2 square kilometres (1,359.5 sq. mi),scattered over 2,500,000 square kilometres (965,255 sq. mi) of ocean. There are around 130 islands in French Polynesia.

French poly map

It is made up of six groups of islands. The largest and most populated island is Tahiti, in the Society Islands.

The island groups are:

Mehetia

Tahiti

Tetiaroa

Moorea

Maiao

  • Leeward Islands

Huahine

Raiatea

Tahaa

Bora Bora

Tupai

Maupiti

Mopelia

Motu One

Manuae

 {Wikipedia}

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Tuvalu

is a Polynesian island nation

Which independence from the United Kingdom in 1978

Motto “Tuvalu for the Almighty”

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Samoa

Independent from New Zealand in 1962

Motto “Samoa is founded on God”

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Tonga

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Cook Islands Responsibility of New Zealand

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Niue

In 2003, Niue became the world’s first “Wi-Fi nation”, in which free wireless internet access is provided throughout the country by The Internet Users Society-Niue.

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Fiji

Independence from The United Kingdom in 1970

Motto “Fear God and honour the queen”

Use Fijian dollar

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New Zealand

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And this one a yellow fabric to make a quarantine flag. Is necessary to fly when you arrive at each country.

Quarantine flag is yellow flag flown by itself by a ship requesting pratique on entering a harbour to indicate that the ship has no disease on board; flag flown by a ship with another flag to indicate that it has contagious or infectious disease aboard.

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Biscuit style of Vanilla Eclairs | Pastry treat

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Back to our boat with less comfortable but we love this adventure life style.

I have more information of my baking from Grande Prairie. I made this pastry ‘Laduree Vanilla Éclairs’ with inspiration by  Kitchen Wench / Laduree Vanilla Éclairs /The original recipe from Laduree Sucre.  This is an attractive biscuit Éclair, I have made a few times and it always catches the eyes on the table. When using light pastry cream it is another charm of this recipe…less fat and not too sweet. The presentation today I changed to use Choux Pastry recipe from Chef Gordon Ramsay because it has more of a guarantee to rise properly and become  fully puffed up. (Also a thin biscuit will add more weight on top of Choux pastry).

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I special carefully to make thin biscuit to   cover the size of each oblong choux pastry. After put in the oven I like to keep watching these Éclairs rising and adjust the temperature if needed until they fully puffed.

P.S. : Use piping bag (or tube) to pipe lightened pastry cream before serve. Dust icing sugar to make the eclairs more prettier just like a light snow fall.  (I miss it out for photo)

  • Room temperature does effect while rolling biscuit. Make sure the room is not too warm or hot.

We hope you like as we do and have a lovely springs! 

Biscuit Style ~ Vanilla Éclairs

Recipe courtesy ~ Laduree Sucre, Paris ~

Biscuit Topping

100 grams Unsalted butter, very cold

125 grams Cake flour

125 grams fine granulated sugar (caster sugar)

1 teaspoon Pure vanilla extract

Lightened pastry cream {Lightened Crème Pâtissière} 

1 Vanilla bean (Last minute, I couldn’t find a vanilla bean in a pantry so I replace it with 1 Tbsp of Pure Vanilla extract )

400 ml Whole Milk (This presentation use 2% milk)

4 egg yolks

80 grams sugar (This presentation use fine granulated sugar)

30 grams Cornstarch

25 grams Unsalted Butter (at room temperature)

125 grams Fresh cream (is the same of heavy cream or double cream)

Choux Pastry

Recipe courtesy ~ Chef Gordon Ramsay ~ Related video ~ Profiteroles

  • 125 ml milk
  • 200 ml water
  • 150 g plain flour (I use 100 grams all purpose flour and 50 grams of cake flour)
  • 1 tsp golden caster sugar (This presentation use fine granulated sugar)
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 100 g unsalted butter
  • 4 medium eggs, lightly beaten

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Prepare Biscuit topping

DSC_06331. Cut the chilled butter into small pieces, then mix together with the flour, sugar and vanilla till well combined. 2. Bring the mixture together into a ball by hand and chill in refrigerate for an hour. 3. After one hour, take the biscuit topping out of the fridge and lightly knead to soften, then place between two sheets of non-stick baking paper or plastic wrap and roll flat to about 1-2mm thick. Cut into rectangles about 4cm x 12cm, to make sure that it completely covers the eclairs and hangs off the sides.prepare for Choux Pastry

  •  (Keep biscuits that already cuts in a refrigerator until ready to use)

**While biscuit is chilling we can make Choux Pastry***

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Making Choux Pastry | baking

DSC_06661. Preheat the oven to 392 Farenheit (200 celcius). Sift the flour and salt into a bowl. Place the milk, cold water, salt, sugar into a pan and set over a low heat. Once the sugar and salt has dissolved add the butter. Once the butter has melted, bring to a rolling boil. Turn off the heat then tip in the flour and beat vigorously with a wooden spoon. As soon as the mixture starts to come away from the side of the pan, stop beating and tip onto a plate to cool. 2. Return the mixture to the pan, then gradually beat in the eggs, a little at a time, mixing well between each addition, until you have a smooth paste. (Alternatively, transfer the mix to an electric mixer and DSC_0669gradually add the eggs while the mixer is running on a low setting). Until the dough is smooth and glossy. 3. Fill a large piping bag with a 1″ / 2.5cm round tip and pipe out long ‘sausages’ about 10cm long onto a tray lined with baking paper. Make sure to leave about 10cm between each pastry to leave room for them to spread. 4. Bring biscuit topping out from a refrigerator. 5. Place each rectangle of ‘biscuit’ topping on top of each eclair, then bake for 10 minutes, then lower a temperature to 350 Farenheit  and allow to bake for until they are golden on top and fully puffed up.  Set aside to cool before filling.

(Below slides show : making Choux pastry)

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Making The Lightened crèam Pâtissière {Lightened pastry cream}

DSC_07621. Whisk together the egg yolks and sugar, then add the corn starch and whisk till mixture becomes pale yellow and thickened. 2. Set aside and scrape the vanilla into the milk and bring to a simmer. 3. Slowly pour the milk into the egg yolk mixture in a thin stream while constantly beating. 4. Pour back into the saucepan and bring to a boil while whisking, making sure to scrape down the sides. 5. Leave the mixture to cool for about 10 minutes so that it’s no longer boiling, then briskly whisk in the butter till the mixture is smooth and glossy. 6. Scrape the mixture into a non-reactive bowl and keep tightly covered with plastic wrap till ready to use. Once you’re ready to fill the eclairs, beat the cream to firm peaks then carefully mix together the cream and the pastry cream with a spatula. 7. Fill a piping bag with the mixture then pipe each eclair with the pastry cream in three places and dust with icing sugar before serving! You can actually store the unfilled pastries for up to a week in an airtight container, but after filling them up it’s best to store them in the fridge for no more than 2-3 days at most otherwise the filling will seep into the pastry and begin to make it soggy.

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Welcome aboard!

Pithiviers with almond cream

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This post of my “Pithiviers” (Sweet Puff Pastry day) that features a golden crust with almond cream filling. (Almonds lover pastry)

Related Post: ‘Puff Pastry’ | Fearless recipe

The first inspiration to make this classic french dessert is from Martha Stewart, She made quite pretty one of Pithiviers. Another reason is we already have ground almond stocked in the pantry. The puff pastry was made one day before and keep in a refrigerator. (One batch of puff pastry|Fearless recipe can make 2 pithiviers of 9”.

We hope that you enjoy both recipes of Puff Pastry and Pithiviers. Have a delicious day!

Related VideoChef Francois shares recipe for puff pastry (Really nice)

P.S.

  • From Related video above, Chef Francois pipe almond cream which was beautiful but almond cream I made was not easy to pipe because keep in the fridge  before…..so next time I probably make the almond cream just before to pipe. 
  • The amount of Frangipane (almond cream) does make different appearance after baked Pithivier. If I put too much so Pithiver will break and the filling run outside puff pastry. It does happen at the first Pithivier.
  • Carefully to make some artist by score on the top with back knife. if press to deep then later puff pastry can explode and Frangipane run out.

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FOR THE FRANGIPANE (Almond cream) Make about 1 1/2 cups

Recipe from Martha Stewart
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 large egg
1 cup finely ground blanched almonds
3 tablespoons dark rum
1 teaspoon pure almond extract
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

FOR ASSEMBLING

All-purpose flour, for dusting
1 pound of puff pastry or about 455 grams will make 9″ Pithivier
1 egg yolk
1 tablespoon heavy cream

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STEP 1 Prepare the Puff Pastry

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STEP 2

Make the frangipane (Almond cream){Frangipane is a filling made from or flavoured with almonds.}

In an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add egg, ground almonds, rum, almond extract, and flour; beat until smooth. Will keep refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 1 week.

*This step I fitted with whisk attachment because it cream butter and sugar better light and fluffy than the paddle one.*

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STEP 3

On a lightly floured work surface, roll out puff pastry into a rectangle about 18 by 9 inches and 1/8 inch thick. Using a 9-inch cake pan as a guide, cut two 9-inch rounds from the dough with a very sharp paring knife or pastry wheel. Using a 1-inch circular biscuit cutter or a large round pastry tip, cut out a steam vent from the center of the top round. Place rounds on a baking sheet and freeze until very firm but still pliable, about 20 minutes.

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STEP 4

In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolk and heavy cream for the egg wash.

  1. STEP 5

  2. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Remove dough from freezer. Place frozen frangipane round in the center of the bottom dough circle. Brush the border with egg wash, taking special care not to let the egg wash drip down the sides, which would inhibit proper puffing during baking. Place the second round on top, and press to seal, using your fingers. Using a small paring knife, score the top of each Pithivier in a circular, decorative cross-hatch pattern. With a small paring knife, score around edges in 1/4-inch increments. Transfer Pithiviers to a baking sheet sprayed well with water and chill for at least 1 hour.

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STEP 6

Remove Pithiviers from freezer. Brush top with egg wash, again being careful not to let any excess drip down over cut edge of dough. Bake until puffed and golden brown, about 45 to 50 minutes.

(I baked 375 farenheit for about 25 minutes and lower to 350 Farenheit for about 20-25 minutes for this 9 inches)

STEP 7

Transfer Pithiviers to a wire rack, and let cool at least 20 minutes before serving.

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The first Pithivier (above photo)

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and Second Pithivier (just baked)

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Puff Pastry | Fearless recipe

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During our stay in Grande Prairie.  I was interested to make a french dessert called ‘Pithiviers’ or ‘Pithivier’. The recipe needs puff pastry.  I prefer to do homemade Puff Pastry and so I searched for a good quality recipe for a while. Eventually I got an original recipe from Pastry Chef Bo Friberg.  In the recipe it advised to use bread flour but I decided to use cake & pastry flour.  The recipe is quite easy to follow.  It took me  about 3 hours to complete this puff pastry.

The best part of making my own puff pastry is when you divided into 4 segments by pizza cutter and see thin layer. Later I pack each piece in zip log bag to keep in refrigerator with hope to make ‘Pithivers’ next day.

So whenever I would like to use puff pastry here is one of puff pastry recipe to be fearless.  ***As long as a temperature in the room while making is not too warm or hot …winter is nice to make. I will make sure that there is a refrigerator near by me. Because I don’t have to run far to put the dough back quickly after fold each time.  Hope you enjoy this recipe the same as me and have a cozy day!

See you next post on home made ‘Pithiviers’

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Puff Pastry

(Recipe from whiteonricecouple/The Exquisite Joy of Puff Pastry, This recipe is based off of “The Professional Pastry Chef” by Bo FribergPuff Pastry

Ingredients: (Yield 2 lb or 910 grams) 

butter block ingredients

1 lb + 3 1/2 T (510g) cold unsalted Butter
2 t (10ml) Lemon Juice
pinch of Salt
1 c (130g) Bread Flour, I use Cake & Pastry flour

Dough ingredients

  • 3 c (400g) Bread Flour, approximately, I use Cake and Pastry flour
  • 3 1/2 T (55g) soft unsalted Butter
  • 2 t Salt
  • 1 c (240ml) cold Water

Directions:

Make Butter Block (below slides show)

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1. In mixer w/ paddle attachment, work butter lemon juice, salt, and flour into a smooth paste.

2. On a sheet of wax paper, roughly form an approx. 6″ square with the butter block mixture. Lay another piece of wax paper on top and smooth out the square & straighten the sides. Peel back each wax paper sheet & re-lay as it wrinkles to keep a smooth, even surface. After block’s thickness & sides areeven, refrigerate until firm.

DSC_0964DSC_0968Make the dough
1. Sift flour onto your work surface (preferably something chilly like granite or marble slab) Pinch butter into chunks and place on top of flour. Continue pinching butter into flour until it resembles coarse crumbs.
2. Now it’s kind of like making fresh pasta. Shape into a mound, then make a well in the center of the mound. Add the salt & cold water into the well, then with a fork, use awhisking motion to gradually incorporate the well’s sides into the water. When it starts to form a solid mass, finish incorporating theflour by kneading. Incorporate just until it is still sticky and has a rough texture. Adjust the water & flour as needed. Try to knead as little as possible. Puff pastry likes lazy kneaders.3. Form dough into a ball, remember-knead as little as possible. Flatten the ball a bit, then cut a cross halfway through the dough. Wrap it up & let rest in fridge for 30 minutes.

You’ll want the Butter Block to have approximately the same consistency as the Dough, after the dough is rested. You don’t want the butter rock hard, but not mushy soft, either. A dough that is softer than the butter will stretch while the

butter doesn’t. If the butter is softer thanthe dough, it will be pushed out the sides. Either suck to some degree. You may have to adjust chill/resting times for either dough or butter block so they are about the same. Kitchen temp., how long it took to make the dough, fridge temp., all affect the consistency of the Butter Block & Dough. Figure out adjustments to make so they’ll work together homogeneously. It may take a time or two, but you’ll get the hang of it. While everything is chilling, get to work. Clean that kitchen up. Then relax & get ready to assemble.

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Assembly

DSC_09811. Pull the corners of the cuts out of the DSC_0983dough ball to make a square shape. Roll the dough out to a square slightly thicker in the center than on the sides, and slightly larger than the butter block.

2. Place the butter block diagonally on the dough square, so that the butter corners are pointed at the middle of the dough sides. Fold the uncovered dough corners over the butter block to completely envelop the butter. Pinch the seams tightly together to seal in the butter.

3. Dust your work surface with flour, and roll the dough into a rectangle about 1/2″ thick. Remember to keep dusting with flour whenever needed to keep the dough from sticking & tearing the layers.

4. Size up your rectangle visually into 3. Fold one third over the middle, then fold the opposite third over. Just like a tri-fold brochure. Try to have everything as even as possible. All the edges should match fairly closely. Put on a plate, cover, and refrigerate for about 30 minutes. Relax, read the paper, check email, whatever you like.

5. Roll out to 1/2″ thick and repeat the DSC_0984

fold. Don’t forget to flour as you roll. Plate, cover, and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Repeat this for a total five roll & folds.

6. After the last fold, roll the rectangle out to about 3/4″. If it is difficult, put dough in the fridge for a bit to relax the gluten. If using immediately, cover, rest in fridge for about 30 minutes, then use as needed. If it’s for later, cut into sections big enough but that still fit easily in your freezer (usually just in half), layer with wax paper between sections, freezer bag it, & store until needed.

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-Cutting dough

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Grande Prairie, February 2014

Grande Prairie, February 2014 with minus 20, 30

Tart pan Coffee cake

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DSC_0529Early this month I just about lost my marbles when I tried to make a coffee cake like a cinnamon swirl I had from Starbucks. It seems I got a scam recipe from the internet.

The menu of coffee cake today I got the original recipe from Mama’s gotta bake/Too big to fail/1959 LAUSD Sour cream coffee cake/From the Los Angeles Times. I am happy and secure that it is correct because after the first batch everyone in the house love it. So I must bake it again.

The first time I use a glass container to bake and it takes time about one hour for the cake to finish. (toothpick come out clean)

So this second time I use a tart pan that is light aluminium. The cake can finish about  40 minutes (I bake a few minutes longer)…Cake well done.

DSC_0525The recipe below I have adapted a few ingredients are flour – I use only cake flour so a second batch cake texture is more light, Topping – Add cinnamon powder  and use pecan instead of walnuts.  

The cake came out fine, moist at the bottom and crumb on top and to be carefully upside down to cool. The tart pan is wide then the cake is not high as the same as the first time. Cake texture is moist, light and soft. We do love both first and second batch.

Hope you like this sour cream coffee cake recipe.

Sour cream coffee cake

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2 cups Cake flour, sifted

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 cup butter

1 cup Fine granulated sugar

1 egg, lightly beaten

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 cup sour cream

Topping

1/4 cup cake flour

3/4 cup brown sugar, packed

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 cup chopped pecan

1/4 cup unsalted butter, room temperature

1 teaspoon Cinnamon powder

Method

Mix together flour, sugar, salt, cinnamon powder and nuts. Add butter in small pieces. Rub in by hand until mixture is crumbly. Do not over mix.

All ingredients should be at room temperature. In a bowl mix together flours, baking soda and baking powder. In bowl of electric mixer, cream together butter and sugar until fluffy and light.  Add egg and vanilla and mix well. Add half of the dry ingredients, mixing just until flour is blended. Blend in sour cream, then remaining dry ingredients.

Butter and flour a 9-inch tube pan. Spread half of the batter into the pan. Sprinkle with half of the topping and spread with remaining batter. Sprinkle with remaining topping. Bake at 350 degrees F for 40-45 minutes.  Makes 8 servings.

Warning!!!

Tart pan may not high enough and while the cake is rising it may drop from the pan.

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P.S. Below photos | The first batch sour cream coffee cake.

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Another scones recipe you may like

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Greetings from Grande Prairie,

When we first arrived in Grande Prairie during the first week in February the weather was very cold and dry with minus 20, 30. We did not go to the grocery store as often as I wish for.

Today I present the scones to have with coffee or tea.  This recipe use buttermilk and the feature is likely hotel style.  Someone may like tradition style with gentle combine by hand for crumb texture scones.  This recipe will give you a round smooth shape and you can use paddle attachment to help mixing a smooth dough. Regarding in Grande Prairie weather is very cold and dry, I need to use more liquid ingredient (buttermilk) than indicated from the recipe.

As usual I enjoy Carmel’s kitchen to bake this lovely scones. I use a round cutter to cut and the size that is a little smaller than 5.5 cm but is come out fine. I made totally 21 scones for 500 grams of flour.

I feel quite satisfy and to share this another scones recipe and I hope you will like as well.

Have a great week!

Buttermilk scones 

(The recipe  is from magellanstraits.com) I use 1/2 recipe from the original recipe which can make about 20 scones

500 grams flour (I use all purpose flour and cake flour)

30 g baking powder

2.5 g salt

90 g Granulated sugar

80 g unsalted butter

105 g Whole eggs

150 g butter milk, I finally use more than 150 grams because of the dryness of the climate here so the dough is moist and not lump dry

125 g sultanas (Can be replaced with raisins, currants, candied oranges or lemon), I use only 70 grams of yellow raisins that we only have in the pantry.

Method

In a mixer, fitted with a paddle attachment,  mix all the dry ingredients (apart from the sultanas) with the butter until achieving a sandy texture. Pour in the eggs and the buttermilk and mix for two minutes on low speed before increasing to a medium speed for seven minutes.

Towards the end of the mix, add in the sultanas and mix very gently until combined. By hand roll the dough into a very smooth ball then cover with cling film and leave to rest  for 20 minutes. Roll out the dough to a thickness of 20 millimetres and cut with a round 5.5cm cutter – choose the best side for the top. Egg wash twice and cook at 200 degrees Celsius for approximately 15 minutes.

Addition

(Ludwig Hely – Assistant Pastry Chef) at The Savoy. Like all the best recipes, the secret is in the simplicity….

  • Use buttermilk for the recipe
  • Add the sultanas or fruit at the end of the mix process so you do not bruise and cause possible discolouration of the dough
  • Use a round shape and don’t make them too big
  • Brush egg wash over the scones twice before going in the oven
  • Make sure your oven has reached the right temperature before putting in the oven – 200 degrees
  • Rest the scone before you serve them

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Port of Origin, now applied.

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The important to put on a stern city sticker

We have added a sticker of Prince Rupert to the stern. This sticker was made  more than 10 years ago but never used, but it still works. So it is now legal for cruising in any foreign country. The sticker I choose to put on in the calm day and without wind and current. Prince Rupert had a beautiful two weeks just before we escape a few weeks in Grande Prairie Alberta. In GP the temp was cold often C-27.

Have a great day.

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Mast steps # Re do it again

DSC_0064 Change from the Weak to Strong.

Last week Stephen took all the mast steps off and re-install them back one by one step with 70 new bolts.  To re do this task a second time because one mast step had fall down.  Which meant that 70 rivets had to be drilled out, the steps re-drilled, the mast re-drilled and tapped for the bolt threads and then everything matched up so that 5 new bolts for each of the 14 steps  fit and good be tightened on.

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Anchor chains

Sprays the anchor chains We remark the white spray to know how deep we use the anchor chain when we anchorage in the tropical ocean. DSC_0169

Of course the weather is not the best for doing this. Last days frozen and clear today threatening to rain which it did. I did notice the boat bow came up 4 inches when we took the chain out. Still this and the Anchor is the single most important safety gear on the boat. So we can sleep well at nights at anchor.

See you next post and thank you to be friends of our blog.

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Cabin book shelf and more …| New completed (Do that in Fiji) Projects of new year 2014

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Do it yourself Cabin book shelf

Galley : Do it yourself plate shelf

Front cabin

  • Cabin stowage net before that doesn’t work so we build an extra wood to store clothes. Now it is work. 

Dear Readers and friends,

Our blog is updating again for the first post of 2014. In past December the weather out here was rain and continued with winter storms now January is very bad and the harbour very rough with the boat bouncing like in the Ocean.  We are feeling more delight to see a little bit of longer daylight each day.  Although we have few sunshine days of each month but the happy people said we should grateful where we live. We have come to enjoy our less stressful lifestyle here. We have done jobs for the main cabin, galley and fore cabin. We made furnishings  for the empty walls so that it is more useful for cruising.  Stephen bought  pieces  of fir wood to cut and make shelfs to install in some space, for keeping books and dishes also cloths in easy to reach places . We had to be careful in their placement so that they did not get in the way of seating and sleeping.

December last year we had one job done. It was a challenge to build useful things  with no experience  before. We often get the knowledge from the internet. Stephen bought some fir wood and it would have been much more difficult without a wood cutter machines. Or we must use the jig saw to cut the wood. We use the work shop from the Argosy shop to finish this wood work. That would be very difficult to do it all in boat cabin while outside had rain with humidity 100% everyday in that two weeks periods. Before I was interested to use the cedar wood because the wood smell so good and it is from B.C. forest.  But impossible since the only wood available was rough cut, for home construction, the surface of cedar wood is not smooth for this furnish job. The colour of vanish is something that we can make a mistake and we did it and sometime must re-do it again.  After these shelf were installed we can feel it is more easy to find things.

P.S. When she says, we she means me :) Steph

DSC_0760 ‘Mae’ shown me how to hold Pacific coast Dangeness crab by grab the last two legs….quite easy.

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The share holder…I can calculate these two Dangeness can be cost 50 Canadian dollars if you dine out in some restaurants here.

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Mount Hays | Winter Adventure

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The top of Mount Hays, Prince Rupert

Regarding to follow up the previous post of The view of Prince Rupert from the airplane. Today I have a chance to walk from sea level up to the top of Mount Hays to see the view of Prince Rupert city and harbour and hike down. It takes time about 5-6 hours walking. It is a sunshine day after it rains with storm winds so hard for so many days which is normal winter here.

While Steph Worked on the boat. I had the chance to hike up Mount Hays with our Swiss Cruising Friends and our best Friend Maisie. We had a wicked week of storm after storm and the boat was bouncing around tied to the dock. The rain and wind , at times over 40 knots lasted all week. Then this beautiful day and Wow! What an adventure we all had… It is so special to have the chance of sharing the unspoilt beauty of the North Coast with such good friends.  I wonder if the next generation will have this opportunity as the Oil and Gas multi-nationals push to develop this area. it would be such a crime if the greed of a few were to destroy this natural paradise.

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Far away from the back of the cloud you can see Haida Gwai.

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North America continental divided

North America continental divided

DSC_0387 The Rockies mountains range is dividing Alberta (flatlands) and British Columbia

Hi there!

I have photos from our trip between Prince Rupert and Northern Alberta. They show clearly the divide between the Flat Prairies that cover much of Western Canada and our own very Mountainous BC.

When comparing to driving, traveling by air you see more of a total picture of this country.

From the first photo you can see The Rocky Mountains (which range from north to south) line as a borders between Alberta and British Columbia.  The flat land that present the Prairie of Alberta where as the high mountains to go to British Columbia. For the first time I understand the size of Canada and how few people live in this vast country!

                                           Population 2013                    Area (Sq. km.)                            Population Density  (Sq. km.)                                                

Canada    35,158,300   9,984,670.00     3.41 - -
USA          320,583,462    9,826,675.00      32.62 -  -
Thailand     70,473,102        513,120.00         137.34  -  -
 

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Calgary, Alberta 

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Also Calgary

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B.C. mountains

All mountains were already white with snow as we travel by plane from our place in Prince Rupert to Vancouver and then east to Calgary before flying North again to Grande Prairie.

I made the 1.45 hours flight to Vancouver again within a week when I became a permanent resident :) At this time I learn that some Canadian not familiar with our small Prince Rupert.  The entire trip by air from Prince Rupert is over high rugged mountains, These Coastal ranges stretch  from Alaska down to Vancouver.

Have a great month of December!

Photographs from this post taken on late November 2013.

Population information : http://countrymeters.info, Wikipedia

Hot oven ‘Freshly baked croissants’

Hot oven ‘Freshly baked croissants’
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We were away from our boat in Prince Rupert in early November as we visited Grande Prairie Alberta. We Enjoyed staying over there for two weeks with family.  Today I present some baking therapy as i present my experience of make the classic french croissant with normal type of all purpose flour.  Carmel’s beautiful kitchen that make me forget about cooking in galley for a while. No one had complaints to have the fresh baking everyday for breakfast lol. The croissant takes time for 3 days to be ready to bake, I have done totally  8 batches (Living there two weeks). Each time making two batches so  that we have enough for breakfast and still have some left over. This recipe is quite impressive and successful than other recipes I had tried before.  The only thing that I cannot find in this recipe is the French type flour 55, It seems you must order from France which I don’t think I will invest the money…I use all purpose flour what we already had in a pantry. So with this features of this croissant use the Canadian brand ‘Robinhood’ all purpose flour.  I wish to try the king Arthur flour from US  but this one is not available here. This is the classic croissant recipe that I will keep. It would be more exciting to do this croissant with the french type flour 55 in the future.

 

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The Croissant recipe (Classic French Croissant Recipe from weekend bakery.com)

500 g French Type 55 flour or unbleached all purpose flour / plain flour (extra for dusting), I use all purpose flour ‘Robinhood’

140 g Water

140 g Whole milk (you can take it straight from the fridge)

55 g sugar

40 g soft unsalted butter

11 g instant yeast

12 g salt, *** I use only 7 g ***

Other Ingredients

280 g Cold unsalted butter for laminating

1 egg + 1 tsp water for the egg wash, (I use 1 egg + 1 Tbsp of whole milk)

Day 1 Making the Croissant Dough Combine the dough ingredients and knead for 3 minutes until the dough comes together and you’ve reached the stage of low to moderate gluten development. You do not want too much gluten development because you will struggle with the dough fighting back during laminating. Shape the dough like a disc, not a ball, before you refrigerate it, so it will be easier to roll it into a square shape the following day. Place the disc on a plate, cover with clingfilm and leave in the fridge overnight.

Day 2 Laminating the Dough Cut the cold butter (directly from the fridge) lengthwise into 1,25 cm thick slabs. Arrange the pieces of butter on waxed paper to form a square of about 15 cm x 15 cm. Cover the butter with another layer of waxed paper and with a rolling pin pound butter until it’s about 19 cm x 19 cm. Trim / straighten the edges of the butter and put the trimmings on top of the square. Now pound lightly until you have a final square of 17 cm x 17 cm. Wrap in paper and refrigerate the butter slab until needed.

Use just enough flour on your work surface to prevent the dough from sticking. However keep the amount to a minimum, otherwise too much flour will be incorporated between the layers and this will show in the end result.

Take the dough out of the fridge. Roll out the dough disc into a 26 cm x 26 cm square. Try to get the square as perfect as possible and with an even thickness. Get the slab of butter from the fridge. Place the dough square so one of the sides of the square is facing you and place the butter slab on it with a 45 degree angle to the dough so a point of the butter square is facing you. Fold a flap of dough over the butter, so the point of the dough reaches the center of the butter. Do the same with the three other flaps. The edges of the dough flaps should slightly overlap to fully enclose the butter. With the palm of your hand lightly press the edges to seal the seams. Now the dough with the sealed in butter needs to be rolled out. With a lightly floured rolling pin start rolling out, on a lightly flour dusted surface, the dough to a rectangle of 20 x 60 cm. Start rolling from the center of the dough towards the edges, and not from one side of the dough all the way to the other side. This technique helps you to keep the dough at an even thickness. You can also rotate your dough 180 degrees to keep it more even, because you tend to use more pressure when rolling away from you than towards yourself. You can use these techniques during all the rolling steps of this recipe. Aim at lengthening the dough instead of making it wider and try to keep all edges as straight as possible. Fold the dough letter style, cover with clingfilm and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Repeat the rolling and folding two more times (ending up with 27 layers in total), each time rolling until the dough is about 20 cm x 60 cm. After each fold you should turn the dough 90 degrees before rolling again. The open ‘end’ of the dough should be towards you every time when rolling out the dough. After the second turn, again give it a 30 minute rest in the fridge. After the third turn you leave the dough in the fridge overnight until day 3, the actual croissant making day!

  • Roll out to 20 cm x 60 cm
  • Refrigerate 30 minutes
  • Rotate 90 degrees
  • Roll out to 20 cm x 60 cm
  • Refrigerate 30 minutes
  • Rotate 90 degrees
  • Roll out to 20 cm x 60 cm
  • Refrigerate until day 3
  • Rotate 90 degrees
  • Roll out to 20 cm x 110 cm
  • Each laminating step should not take more than a few minutes. However if, due to initial inexperience for example, it should take you longer, you can fold your dough letter style, cover it and refrigerate it for 20 minutes and continue the rolling process after this rest. It is very important the butter stays solid.

Day 3 Dividing the Dough Take the dough from the fridge. Lightly flour your work surface. Now very gently roll the dough into a long and narrow strip of 20 cm x 110 cm. If the dough starts to resist too much or shrink back during this process you can fold it in thirds and give it a rest in the fridge for 10 to 20 minutes before continuing. Do not fight the dough, when the dough refuses to get any longer, rest it in the fridge! It is such a shame to ruin two days of work. When your dough has reached its intended shape, carefully lift it a few centimeters to allow it to naturally shrink back from both sides. This way it will not shrink when you cut it. Your strip of dough should be long enough to allow you to trim the ends to make them straight and still be left with a length of about 100 cm.

Shaping the Croissants For the next stage you will need a tape measure and a pizza wheel. Lay a tape measure along the top of the dough. With the wheel you mark the top of the dough at 12,5 cm intervals along the length (7 marks total). Now lay the tape measure along the bottom of the dough and make a mark at 6,25 cm. Then continue to make marks at 12,5 cm intervals from this point (8 marks total). So the bottom and the top marks do not align with each other and form the basis for your triangles. Now make diagonal cuts starting from the top corner cutting down to the first bottom mark. Make diagonal cuts along the entire length of the dough. Then change the angle and make cuts from the other top corner to the bottom mark to create triangles. Again repeat this along the length of the dough. This way you will end up with 15 triangles and a few end pieces of dough. Using your pizza wheel, make 1.5 cm long notches in the center of the short side of each dough triangle. Now very gently elongate each triangle to about 25 cm. This is often done by hand, but we have found that elongating with a rolling pin, very carefully, almost without putting pressure on the dough triangle, works better for us. You can try both methods and see what you think gives the best result. After you cut a notch in the middle of the short end of the triangle, try and roll the two wings by moving your hands outwards from the center, creating the desired shape with a thinner, longer point. Also try and roll the dough very tightly at the beginning and put enough pressure on the dough to make the layers stick together (but not so much as to damage the layers of course). Proofing and Baking Arrange the shaped croissants on baking sheets, making sure to keep enough space between them so they will not touch when proofing and baking. Combine the egg with a teaspoon of water and whisk until smooth. Give the croissants their first thin coating of egg wash. Proof the croissants draft-free at an ideal temperature of 24ºC to 26.5ºC (above that temperature there is a big chance butter will leak out!). We use our small Rofco B20 stone oven as a croissant proofing cabinet by preheating it for a minute to 25ºC / 77ºF. It retains this temperature for a long time because of the oven stones and isolation. The proofing should take about 2 hours. You should be able to tell if they are ready by carefully shaking the baking sheet and see if the croissants slightly wiggle. You should also be able to see the layers of dough when looking at your croissants from the side. DSC_0184 Preheat the oven at 200 ºC / 390 ºF convection or 220 ºC / 430 ºF conventional oven. We bake the croissants in our big convection oven for 6 minutes at 195ºC, then lowering the temperature to 165ºC, and bake them for another 9 minutes. Hamelman suggest baking the croissants for 18 to 20 minutes at 200ºC, turning your oven down a notch if you think the browning goes too quickly. But you really have to learn from experience and by baking several batches what the ideal time and temperature is for your own oven. Take out of the oven, leave for a few minutes on the baking sheet, then transfer to a cooling rack. Best eaten while warm and fresh of course. Croissant we don’t eat or share within a day we freeze. We put them in the preheated oven (180 ºC / 355 ºF) for 8 minutes straight from the freezer. Nothing wrong with that, croissants eaten nice and warm, almost as good as the fresh ones…almost!

We used the excess dough we trimmed from the edges to make, a bit odd shaped but still very delicious, ‘pain au chocolat’, using our favorite Valrhona Caraïbe dark chocolate. The trimmed dough parts are still worth using, it would be a shame to throw them away!
**The croissant I made for this presentation I use the convection oven and bake at 408 Farenheit (383+25)  for 6 minutes then low the temperature to 354  Farenheit (329+25) for 9 minutes. The finished croissant taste good and have modulate layer.

Little note

  • I use half of salt  so when you eat the croissant someone may like to have croissant with salt butter.
  • I brush with milk for the first brush and then with egg wash. (use a strainer)
  • It is important while rest croissant for two hours make sure the butter is not melt before baking time.

Hot from the Oven croissant…Bon Appétité!

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First snows in Grande Prairie early November 5th, 2013

Patience and Waiting

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Greetings from the tropical paradise of Prince Rupert,

 So our beloved blog has been quiet for one month. We finally decided not to leave Prince Rupert until 2014. We  wished we can do it within this year but every time we set to leave there was another delaying  problem coming up. Waiting is painful but the focus has not changed.  We also can  check all the equipment that work set a date to leave or not.

We eventually had the boat ready to go, only to have Canadian and American Bureaucracy defeat our ambitions. Basically an error in Canada  and a Banking error in the USA lead us into the American Republican shutdown of the government services which had us stranded in BC.  Because of being delayed we had changed our plan to coast hop down the USA West Coast however when Luksana was told that her American visitors visa would take 3 months to complete we gave up.

So we have been forced to eat humble pie and enjoy the few nice fall days that have presented themselves. The North Coast is as beautiful as ever.

Happy friday to everyone!

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Four days on the hard

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Bottom after painted ‘black’

We finally motor Beautiful Swimmer and hauled out this week in Port Edward. A boat lift can tell that Beautiful Swimmer weight about 10.5 tons =  9,525 kilograms = 21,000 pounds)  We wash and clean the barnacles, muscles and weed off, it have been two years we did not take her out to clean and paint.

To bring her to the boat yard cost about  $ 1,000 (Including boat lift, paint, regular on the”hard”charge $45 per day). When it’s rain that the delay and to extend to stay more than one day) The atmosphere here is pretty humid from the spray water next to the crab site and the location is close the railway that carry all the British Columbia export including Grain, wheat and coal. Anyway we pay attention to the bottom so we don’t have to stay longer here. (It still takes time 4 -5 days including on weekend that the Port office was closed. While the bottom is cleaning at the same time Steph checked the water system inside the boat and propeller wire disk.

What we have done on the hard.

  • bottom Wash and paint black
  • water maker plumbed in
  • sea water valves replaced and or serviced…
  • check on head (toilet) and clean ……..
  • clean tube and anything that I can get near while out of the water.

Now we decided to leave but the weather forecast is warning about a big storm will coming to the coast in a few days. If we will leave this week to the south it is 50 knots…right against us so we decided to stay during this storm in Prince Rupert. (home coming!)

On the way back to Prince Rupert we  sailed to 6 knots into the harbour. Which is good against a strong tide and the boat laden down with all our cruising supplies.

Have a nice weather!

P.S. On the hard (a sailing term) = on land (out of water)

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The propeller after cleaned and wire disk.

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Sue Such (Australian), Right  & Dennis Sutherland (American), Left  from Dolphin II sailboat also at dry dock. They are heading to south after Alaska – the North coast sailing.

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Symbol of Prince Rupert 2013 Three giant ‘silos’ that store wood pallets. They plan to built four more silos.

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Prince Rupert Real Estate

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‘September’ Time of change

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In the beginning of September most commercial boat in Prince Rupert stop  fishing and our favourite fish and chips shop ‘Bob on the Rock’  just closed and will reopen again in the next summer.  Seeing our dock friends leave to go back home including our new  challenge sailors friends makes us understand we must leave soon as well. The weather is good and we have a pretty nice wind we are now try to rush in equipment installation (water maker) that is about 90% completed.

See you next post and have a great weekend.

 

Challenge sailors docked in Prince Rupert

During this week at our Prince Rupert dock.  We have an opportunity to meet with new overseas sailors who have docked here and have shared their experiences with us.

Edvin Borgen from blog A Passage through Ice http://belzebub2.com/ The young Swedish challenge sailor recently exploring a new route through the Arctic.  He just arrived in Prince Rupert alone late in August with his boat Belzebub before he continues his southward route to Mexico after exploring some sites on the BC coast.

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Edvin Borgen (Left) Hairy Ugly bugger (right)

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Front of the bow has been modified , you can see the Ice breaker special part to get though the ice.

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Edvin spent the last five years rebuilding Belzebub from a wreck to a seaworthy blue water vessel.

Next couple we have met French – Canadian couple Gaston and Lizanne from blog http://bidule.micro.org  “Bidule” the french word and boat name is mean ‘Thing a majig’ they have been sailing around the world for many countries for 3 years and they will be continue crossing the pacific to The Marquesas Islands in next spring 2014.

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Gaston (Left) and Lizzane (Right)

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and we met Mark van de Meg from Northwest Passage 2012 blog http://blog.jonathanadventuresailing.com and http://www.markvandeweg.nl

Mark is from Holland that later he live in Norway. His sailing boat, Jonathan 50 ft Aluminium sailboat has a good insolation to keep warm in low temperature. He is also run expedition charters to take such a scientists, Nature photographer, National Geographic staff to make television and photo. Mark is heading to the south and will cross the Pacific ocean to South Pacific, Pitcairn, Easter Island, Patagonia, Antarctica and South Georgia before sail back to Alaska.

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Lizanne (Left) Mark Van de meg (Right)

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Jonathan III docked in Prince Rupert

Ocean view for appetite & our new plan

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We don’t want to change our plan to the south pacific from 2013 to year 2014 but if it have too… so we then have to wait for next year 2014. We are still waiting for my immigration papers that are now 2 months overdue. Now our work have not much left to do but boat is always have things that you must to make it better. Still have to check with water leaking into the cabin when it rains.  So let the salmon calm down the worry and continue the plan. (Feel enjoy cooking in the galley)  Someone may wonder about the can food that we stock as if we will leave right away but it is not that way. Can food such as corn beef can stay for 10 years in cabin.

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Sailboat – D.I.Y. refrigerator/freezer

Sailboat – D.I.Y. refrigerator/freezer

Hello there! & how are you?

Regarding to the boat galley which did not have a refrigerator and we wanted to have one in the galley. At least now we can get a cool drink :-). The process was to build a small refrigerator (also a freezer) with a power produce by wind generator and solar panel that charge the battery.

Staying at the private dock we don’t worry about battery but when we are out in the ocean somewhere far we will make sure the fridge can work well so we ordered two parts from Engel fridge-freezer conversion and stuff which contains a compressor and condenser. Anyway how to increase the installation it is difficult. There is an extra heavily insulated wooden board we build for top of the fridge. Also the insulation which was only 1 1/2 to 2 inches is now between 4 and 6 inches. This was a messy and very awkward job using insulated board and foam.

Our special thanks to the workshop from The Argosy, Prince Rupert

Cooking in galley

Decided for a long stay on board, cooking in galley is a limited space so we keep less ingredients.  The cooking pan may use only 1-2, if use more there is no space to put on. What a challenge! A pressure cooker is a must to have.

WILD SALMON, KING OF FISH

My dream came true when Ms. Roberta & Capt. Dave Anderson from Albacore hand me a beautiful Coho salmon from their caught in the Pacific. Do you believe that people here get so much spoiled about the wild salmon.

galley is busy

galley is busy (also messy)

beautiful salmon from Ms. Roberta

beautiful salmon from Ms. Roberta

List of equipments for this project we have finished and on going so far.

Windless $1,250

Anchor chain (250ft) $1,350
Anchor 45 lb Mantus $600
6 man liferaft $3,450 (Sponsored)
Solar 100amp x2 , wire , controller and monitor $2,300
Wind gen and tower, wire $1,000
New batteries (golf) $900
Garmin charts $1,000
iPad and navionics charts $850
Ais standard horizon + Aeriel’s etc $550
ARC plb x2 top of the line $900
Cape Horn self steering $4,000
Folding bikes x2 $360
Auto helm $400
LED lights in and out $600
Ssb radio and pactormodem and stuff $2,000
Engal fridge freezer conversion and stuff$1,500
Kat. water maker $2,000
All the crap to stick this stuff on $2,000
First mate………a bloody fortune lol.

Enjoy your day!

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Galley food inspiration by:

Sushi: http://liveblissful.wordpress.com/

Teriyaki sauce : salmon teriyaki  http://www.asweetpeachef.com/entrees/salmon-teriyaki/

Salmon roulade : salmon http://www.chefmorgan.com/pan-seared-salmon-circles-tournedos-de-saumon

Snowbirds Display in Prince Rupert

Snowbirds Display in Prince Rupert

Hello there!

Today we had a once in a lifetime to see the Famous Canadian Airforce acrobatic team “The Snow Birds”.   I left Steph to his eyes in silicon and epoxy fixing the boat winds and got these wonderful  fresh photos of Snow Birds display in Prince Rupert Harbour. What a grey day! The climate is absolutely grey and cloudy but the Canadian Air force did a great thrilling display that took about one hour with all acrobatics. Many seabirds also fly in the sky and it is pretty the same shape of the plane  as if they are part of the team. That was a little bit of funny that I wasn’t sure it was bird or plane while take a picture. The display was impressive! so I then add the last song ‘fly high’ to this post. Hope you enjoy it too. :)

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